IBBA Launches Brangus Built Commercial Program

SAN ANTONIO, TX- The International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA) launched the Brangus Built commercial program designed to help producers identify and garner the added value associated with the Brangus influence of their commercial replacements.

BrangusBUILT tag“The Brangus Built program will give producers who use Brangus genetics an opportunity to highlight those cattle so they can be easily identified,” said Jason Bates, IBBA Director of Field Services and Commercial Marketing. “Most importantly it will help commercial producers looking to purchase Brangus influenced replacements identify those cattle and rest assured they are not just a black or red cow with a little ear.” 

Brangus Built cattle are commercial cattle that are identified as having high valued Brangus influence. The eligible cattle will be assigned ear tags that have the Brangus Built logo along with an individual ID number as well as plenty of room for the producer to add any identification that fits into their program (example: herd ID, dam and/or sire ID, lot number). These tags can stay with that animal indefinitely.

For more than 65 years, the Brangus breed has been known to excel in maternal traits. Brangus cattle have the built-in heterosis from the combination of Angus and Brahman genetics the allows them to transcend other breeds in terms of longevity, fertility, udder soundness, early breed back, and other important maternal traits while still maintaining outstanding performance and carcass characteristics.

The current lows in the nation’s cow inventory and price of feeder cattle has caused a surge in the price of replacement females because so many producers are sending the heifers to the feedlots. The Brangus Built program will help producers maximize their return because a buyer will be willing to spend more knowing those cattle have been identified as having Brangus influence.

In the future, as commercial replacement female prices level off, it will be vital for producers to have an avenue that identifies the added value of their product. The Brangus Built program was designed with that in mind. Contact Jason Bates at (210) 696-8231 to find out about using Brangus genetics and how you can get enrolled for your FREE tags for a limited time, or visit us at www.gobrangus.com for more information.

replacement heifers

Ranchers weigh options on replacement heifers amid historic high prices

COLLEGE STATION – When it comes to replacement heifers in beef cattle operations, producers are faced with a dilemma: Raise them, buy them or sell them and “take the money and run,” said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service economist.

It’s becoming an all too familiar situation among Texas ranchers, said Stan Bevers, an AgriLife Extension economist at Vernon who recently presented a study at the Texas A&M Beef Cattle Short Course.

“We looked at what the market is right now for replacement heifers,” he said. “We were targeting heavy bred heifers, and they were anywhere from $1,650 to $2,300 a head. The second number was what it was costing the rancher to raise them themselves.

When it comes to replacement heifers in beef cattle operations, producers are faced with a dilemma: Raise them, buy them or sell them and “take the money and run.”

“One operation we tracked were heifers weaned in 2010 and 2011, what those heifers were and what their accumulated expenses were over the two years to the point where they were heavy bred. Their expenses totaled $1,100 to $1,400 a head. That ranch was pretty efficient and did a good job of reducing their expenses.”

Bevers said since this ranch was located in Oklahoma, one would need to add $300-$400 a head to that for Texas ranchers and regional market prices to develop replacement heifers.

“That comes out to $1,400 to $1,800 to develop replacement heifers in Texas,” Bevers said.

He said if you look at the current market price, it shows it’s cheaper to “raise them yourself if you are a pretty efficient, cost-reducing type operator.”

“The final number we looked at is if I have to pay much over market cost for them or if I choose to raise a heifer on my own, what is she going to return me over her life?” he said. “We started with a two-year-old heifer that’s going to be having her first calf and added eight years to that. That means we’ve gone out 10 years into the future, so now she is 10 years old,and we came up with what I can pay for her, which was $2,301 a head.”

Bevers said that leaves three numbers to consider.

“We know the market is $1,650 to $2,300, and it takes $1,400 to $1,500 to raise her, and now she is worth $2,300 in my herd economically.

“What do you do with those numbers? Well, if nothing else, it illustrates how complex this decision is right now,” he said. “It’s not right or wrong. It’s based on what type of operation you have and your costs. You finally have to decide to pull the trigger and say this is what we are going to have to do.”

Bevers threw in a fourth number – what feedlots are paying for commercial heifers destined for the beef market. Right now, it’s about $1.93 to $2.03 a pound, he said.

“You are talking about a heifer in the 750-pound range that’s worth $1,500 on the market and that’s for beef,” he said. “So, if you don’t keep her as a replacement heifer, you now have a floor price of about $1,500 a head. If you don’t want to take her and put her back in your operation, the feedlot is going to take her for $1,500 and turn her into beef later down the road.”

Southeast Field Day Generates Big Response

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS–The Southeast Brangus Breeders Association (SBBA) hosted its annual field day at the Draggin’ M Ranch in El Dorado, Ark., August 22-23, 2014. With more than 225 producers in attendance, the event was fun and informative for all who participated and demonstrated a growing interest in expansion opportunities.

The event kicked off Friday, August 22, with a social and steak dinner in which Evon Crooks, President of the SBBA, and John Milam, host and owner of Draggin’ M Ranch, addressed the crowd. A dance and private concert from the Ray Johnston Band provided fun entertainment for guests that evening.

Saturday’s schedule began with a preview of a few well-known herd sires, including Guardian, Landau, Onstar and Coronado just to name a few, and their progeny from several different breeding programs. Following the display of these great genetics, Dr. Noah T. Cosby, representing Purina, talked to field day participants about the importance of a nutrition plan and products available to improve herd condition and health. Dr. Andrew McPeake of VitaFerm spoke about the added value that can be gained from balanced nutrition programs.

“Nutrition is one of the big issues that is always on the breeder’s mind,” Crooks said. “How can they get more pounds for the same amount of feed…because that is what it’s all about.”

Lorna Marshall and Justin Hergenreder, representatives of Genex, gave a presentation about the benefits and trends of artificial insemination and the value of data reporting.

Dr. Tommy Perkins, Executive Vice President of the International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA), addressed the group regarding the positive outlook for the Brangus breed as the industry begins to rebuild the cow herd and answered questions about DNA testing procedures.

“The Field Day was very organized, extremely educational and well attended,” said Perkins. “Having several mature herd sires and their progeny on display was just ‘icing on the cake’ for an already outstanding event”.

Later that afternoon participants directed questions and topics to a panel of producers representing both the commercial and seedstock sectors. Jason Bates, IBBA’s Director of Field Services and Commercial Marketing, moderated the panel consisting of Lorna Marshall of Burlington, Colo.; Mike Vorel of Luther, Okla.; Zak O’Brien of South Coffeeville, Okla.; Chad Parish of Mt. Pleasant, Texas; and Chris Heptinstall of Fairmount, Ga.

Video highlights and coverage will be available at GoBrangus.com. Sponsors of the SBBA field day were the city of El Dorado, Stockman’s Supply, VitaFerm, Purina and First Financial Bank.

The IBBA, headquartered in San Antonio, Texas, strives to provide the commercial cattle industry, domestically and internationally, with the best genetics possible. It was founded as the American Brangus Breeders in 1949 and has since evolved into the IBBA. The purpose of the IBBA is to enable members to serve the commercial cattle industry. For more information, visit GoBrangus.com.

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Brangus on The American Rancher

Watch the Brangus episode now online! For more information about Brangus cattle, visit GoBrangus.com or contact the International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA) by email or call 210-696-8231.