Dykes Joins Brangus Team as Commercial Marketing Coordinator

Kyle Dykes_72

IBBA Commercial Marketing Coordinator Kyle Dykes

SAN ANTONIO, TX– Kyle Dykes joined the staff at the International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA) headquartered in San Antonio, Texas. As the Commercial Marketing Coordinator, Dykes will oversee IBBA’s commercial marketing programs while engaging with members and Brangus producers across the country. Dykes will be integral in expanding the breed’s global market share, promoting Brangus genetics to the commercial sector, and ultimately increasing demand for Brangus cattle.

“I am very honored and excited to go to work for our members,” Dykes said. “I look forward to helping them meet their needs in the purebred cattle business, advancing and promoting the Brangus breed, and building relationships all over the world.”

A native of Killeen, Texas, Dykes grew up on a small farm raising commercial cattle. Agriculture has always been a passion of his, and he has been actively trying to help make a difference and be a part of the growth of agriculture in Texas. Previously, Dykes worked as the Natural Resources County Extension Agent for McLennan County. This allowed him the opportunity to work with some of the finest 4-H youth in Texas and help them get more involved in the 4-H program. In addition to 4-H activities, Kyle managed the Master Gardener program and worked with agricultural producers in McLennan County to help educate and provide assistance to better meet their production goals.

“Kyle has a lot of energy and enthusiasm, and we are proud to have him as a member of the Brangus team,” said IBBA Executive Vice President Dr. Tommy Perkins. “He will engage with our members at sales and visit producers’ operations across the country to bridge the gap between the association and our members. Kyle will be essential in advancing IBBA programs, and I know he will be a great asset to the breed.”

Dykes received his bachelor’s degree in Animal Science from Texas A&M University in 2013. He also received his certificate in Auctioneering from the Texas Auction Academy and has been licensed with the state of Texas since 2011. In 2013 Dykes won the Texas State Champion Rookie Auctioneer title and has gained experience in livestock, equipment and estate sales and is an active member of the Texas Auctioneers Association.

Due to his travel requirements and necessary visibility, Dykes will continue to reside in College Station, Texas, and will work as a remote staff member. Dykes can be contacted directly by email at kdykes@int-brangus.org or on his cell at 254-371-9388. For more information about Brangus cattle and the IBBA, visit www.GoBrangus.com.

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IBBA Launches Brangus Built Commercial Program

SAN ANTONIO, TX- The International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA) launched the Brangus Built commercial program designed to help producers identify and garner the added value associated with the Brangus influence of their commercial replacements.

BrangusBUILT tag“The Brangus Built program will give producers who use Brangus genetics an opportunity to highlight those cattle so they can be easily identified,” said Jason Bates, IBBA Director of Field Services and Commercial Marketing. “Most importantly it will help commercial producers looking to purchase Brangus influenced replacements identify those cattle and rest assured they are not just a black or red cow with a little ear.” 

Brangus Built cattle are commercial cattle that are identified as having high valued Brangus influence. The eligible cattle will be assigned ear tags that have the Brangus Built logo along with an individual ID number as well as plenty of room for the producer to add any identification that fits into their program (example: herd ID, dam and/or sire ID, lot number). These tags can stay with that animal indefinitely.

For more than 65 years, the Brangus breed has been known to excel in maternal traits. Brangus cattle have the built-in heterosis from the combination of Angus and Brahman genetics the allows them to transcend other breeds in terms of longevity, fertility, udder soundness, early breed back, and other important maternal traits while still maintaining outstanding performance and carcass characteristics.

The current lows in the nation’s cow inventory and price of feeder cattle has caused a surge in the price of replacement females because so many producers are sending the heifers to the feedlots. The Brangus Built program will help producers maximize their return because a buyer will be willing to spend more knowing those cattle have been identified as having Brangus influence.

In the future, as commercial replacement female prices level off, it will be vital for producers to have an avenue that identifies the added value of their product. The Brangus Built program was designed with that in mind. Contact Jason Bates at (210) 696-8231 to find out about using Brangus genetics and how you can get enrolled for your FREE tags for a limited time, or visit us at www.gobrangus.com for more information.

replacement heifers

Six Reasons Social Media will Help your Cattle Operation

Lauren Chase

Follow Lauren on Twitter @LaurenMSea or contact her at lauren.chase4@gmail.com

By Lauren Chase

My grandfather was a corn farmer and raised cattle in Iowa for the majority of his life. Now that he is retired, he and his fellow farming buddies head to the local coffee shop at least once a week to brag about grandkids and analyze what’s happening in society. While this type of gathering is still useful and enjoyable, the younger generations are finding other ways to communicate with each other and to market their cattle.

As the beef industry continues to innovate, so do the ways of doing business. Social media has changed how every company markets and brands themselves, as well as public figures, artists and athletes. In our business, it should be no different.

Here are a few ways that social media will help your cattle operation:

1 – Peer Recommendation

If our friend has it, we have to have it too, right? In most cases, the answer is “yes”. What social media has created is a space for your friends, family and acquaintances to share how they feel about all sorts of things even if they enjoyed your bull sale. If a rancher down the road posts on Facebook that he bought a good bull from XYZ Ranch, I’m more inclined to check out the bulls at that ranch because I trust my friend’s opinion. And thus begins the word-of-mouth, free advertisement for XYZ Ranch.

2- Beef Business Online

International Brangus Breeders AssociationToday, there are so many ways for a person to contact another person. If I want to reach a friend, I could call, text, tweet, Facebook message, email, instant message, SnapChat, Instagram them, etc. As chaotic as this sounds, the upcoming generations of beef producers will conduct business through a variety of these forms, and because social media allows for instant contact and an easy way to share visuals, it becomes another way to conduct business.

Are you trying to get people to your bull sale? Post photos of the bulls on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Potential buyers are out there and could message you for more details. Are you trying to make people aware of a legislative issue affecting cattle producers? Post the link to your sites and spread the word. Are you trying to communicate with members in a committee? Develop a group forum on Facebook to keep everyone up to date.

3- Telling the Beef Story

Not only can social media be used to do business, but it is a great way to reach networks of people outside of the beef industry and teach them about agriculture. You become a spokesperson and a face for beef, essentially “humanizing” the industry and making it relatable to the consumer.

Also, the photo of the bull you posted may be geared towards buyers, but it could also catch the eye of your wife’s cousin in New York City who doesn’t know how his steak is produced. Maybe the photo makes him think: “Hmm, I wonder why the bulls are sold like that,” and then messages you to learn more about your sale. Advocacy is a collective effort and the more we can reinforce the beef lifestyle through imagery and social media, the better we can tell the beef story.

4 – Other Advantages

Social media is free and it is relatively easy to produce content. If you have a smartphone, you’re golden. Cross-promotion of content on major social media sites is also easy and will only increase your marketing.

5 – Tips

Carefully consider your content and be ready to engage in conversation if people comment. Reciprocity is key — when you go from being a “talking head” to allowing your customers to have a voice, your interaction will greatly increase.

Watch trends and be willing to try new things. Hashtags are huge on Twitter and have become more frequent on Instagram and Facebook. For those who don’t know, hashtags are like “key words” and can help you engage in the conservations you want to be in. For example: #ranchlife #beef #Texas

6 – @GoBrangus

GoBrangus (gobrangus) on TwitterThe IBBA has done a terrific job of establishing itself on social media sites like Facebook and Twitter. As a Brangus producer, utilize the services they have provided for you. For example: If you are out checking cows and snap a photo of a new calf, tweet it and include a mention to the IBBA (@gobrangus). Most likely, you will be retweeted by them. What does all of this mean? Not only will your photo go out to your followers, but once it’s retweeted, it will go out to all of IBBA’s followers. People who follow IBBA on Twitter, most likely have some interest in Brangus cattle. One of those followers could be a potential buyer for you. It’s a win-win!

Understanding these trends and new marketing techniques is essential for the beef industry in the upcoming decades. Even though our businesses may look different than how our grandparents ran it, we all still share the same passion for the beef industry and want our operations to be successful for our own grandchildren!

About the Author:
Lauren Chase graduated from the University of Iowa with degrees in journalism and anthropology. She now works as the multimedia outreach specialist for the Montana Stockgrowers Association, working to tell the story of Montana family ranching.

Lauren can be contacted by email at lauren.chase4@gmail.com or follow her on Twitter @LaurenMSea